NC prison guard hid drugs, cell phones in Subway and Wendy’s food, indictment says

A federal indictment claims Supervisor Greg Gouldman was sneaking in contraband to multiple inmates — getting paid by people on the outside to sneak things inside.

RALEIGH, NC (WNCN) — Two former NC corrections officers were recently indicted after a prison investigation uncovered alleged smuggling of various banned items.

Federal documents lay out exactly how officials claim one officer was able to sneak in contraband to multiple inmates.

The inmates were in Polk Correctional Institute’s maximum security prison in Butner.

And federal investigators say these guards were putting lives at risk… for their own profit.

“It’s reaching out beyond the bars,” said Kenneth Lassiter, Director of NC Prisons

The FBI started looking into Polk Correctional after an inmate was able to organize the kidnapping of an assistant DA’s father… all from his cell phone while behind bars.

Investigators learned inmates were what they call “gassing guards”.. throwing their own feces and urine at them.

In an effort to make it stop…investigators say prison guards tried to appease the inmates by smuggling in contraband and even allowing them to black out their cell windows –so guards couldn’t see in.

“The one way we hate to speak about but it’s the truth is sometimes they’re able to corrupt our staff,” Lassiter said.

A federal indictment claims Supervisor Greg Gouldman was sneaking in contraband to multiple inmates — getting paid by people on the outside to sneak things inside.

Investigators say he would hide marijuana in Wendy’s hamburgers, cell phones in Subway sandwiches and even brought in a potato chip bag with cellphones…matches and AA batteries that inmates would make phone chargers with.

He charged inmates upwards of $50 for a pack of cigarettes and $300 for a $7 cell phone, the indictment says.

The indictment also calls out Jason Dean… Who they scammed inmates out of money… and sold their valuables for cash.

State prison officials say smuggled cell phones are their number one threat.

“Inmates committing crimes using cell phones happens every day.” Lassiter said.

Both officers could face up to 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

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