S.C. lawmakers to introduce medical cannabis bill Tuesday

FILE - In this June 26, 2015, file photo, different varieties of marijuana flowers are displayed at medical marijuana dispensary in Portland, Ore. The American Medical Association agreed Monday, Nov. 16, 2015, to push for regulations requiring warnings be written on medical and recreational pot products and posted wherever they are sold, based on studies suggesting marijuana use may be linked with low birth weight, premature birth and behavior problems in young children. (AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka, File)
FILE - In this June 26, 2015, file photo, different varieties of marijuana flowers are displayed at medical marijuana dispensary in Portland, Ore. The American Medical Association agreed Monday, Nov. 16, 2015, to push for regulations requiring warnings be written on medical and recreational pot products and posted wherever they are sold, based on studies suggesting marijuana use may be linked with low birth weight, premature birth and behavior problems in young children. (AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka, File)

COLUMBIA, SC – A bipartisan group of state lawmakers will introduce comprehensive medical cannabis legislation Tuesday in the South Carolina General Assembly. At 10:30 a.m., several of the legislators will join patients and advocates in the First Floor Lobby of the State House for a news conference to discuss the South Carolina Compassionate Care Act, which will allow patients suffering from debilitating medical conditions to access medical cannabis if their doctors recommend it.

Lawmakers scheduled to speak at the event include a lead sponsor of the legislation, Sen. Tom Davis (R-Beaufort); House Minority Leader J. Todd Rutherford (D-Richland); Rep. Eric Bedingfield (R-Greenville); and Rep. Mandy Powers Norrell (D-Lancaster).

Patients and family members of patients who would benefit from legal access to medical cannabis will discuss why they believe there is an urgent need for the legislation. Among them will be SC Compassion spokesperson Jill Swing of Charleston, whose 9-year-old daughter has cerebral palsy and epilepsy, and Bill Davis of Townville, an ordained minister with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

-This is from a Press Release.