Victim told suspect: I knew you would ‘shoot up the school’

In this Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017 photo, Spokane County Sheriff's deputies escort Caleb Sharpe from the Public Safety Building to the Juvenile Detention Center in Spokane, Wash. Authorities say Sharpe opened fire Wednesday in a hallway at Freeman High School in Rockford, south of Spokane, killing a classmate who confronted him and wounded three others before being stopped by a custodian. (Colin Mulvany/The Spokesman-Review via AP)

ROCKFORD, Wash. (AP) — Caleb Sharpe rode the bus to his high school in a tiny Washington state town, carrying a black duffel bag. The 15-year-old walked to a second-floor hallway, pulled an assault weapon from the bag and tried to load it, authorities said.

It jammed, and a classmate walked up.

“I always knew you were going to shoot up the school,” the student said, according to court documents released Thursday. “You know this is going to get you in trouble.”

Sharpe pulled a pistol from his coat pocket and shot his classmate, also 15, in the abdomen and then in the face, killing him, according to the documents.

He then walked down the hallway, firing at other students or into the ceiling, authorities say. Three female students were wounded but were expected to survive.

Sharpe told police that he had been bullied by the boy who died but did not target him specifically.

“Instead he’d come to the school to teach everyone a lesson about what happens when you bully others,” the documents said Sharpe told investigators.

The shooting Wednesday at Freeman High School in Rockford came after troubling behavior by Sharpe that the documents and his classmates detailed. They say he brought notes to school about doing “something stupid,” was obsessed with past school shootings and posted videos online that showed him playing with guns.

Sharpe, a sophomore, also had been meeting with a school counselor over suicidal thoughts and had left a suicide note at home for his parents before the shooting, an investigator for the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office wrote in an affidavit.

Freeman High School, which has 300 students, has not responded to calls for comment on how they dealt with Sharpe’s behavior outside of the counseling for his thoughts of hurting himself.

The Associated Press doesn’t typically name juvenile suspects but is doing so because of the severity of the accusations and because Sharpe’s name was released in public documents and was widely used in local media.

His family asked for prayers for those involved as well as for privacy in a statement Thursday.

“The Sharpe family wishes to offer their deepest condolences and sympathies to the entire Freeman community,” according to the statement issued through attorney Bevan Maxey. “They too as a family are devastated.”

The teen took the weapons from his father’s gun safe, to which he knew the combination, authorities said. He kept firing the handgun, striking three students, until it also jammed, the documents say.